Mini Miniature Colorful Glass Large Butterfly Sitter Figurine Collectible – Sold Individually w/Gift Bag

Adorable miniature butterfly figurine measures 1 1/2″ x 1 3/4″. Comes in a small organza gift bag.

Choose from 5 different colors: Red, Light Blue, Dark Blue, Green and Purple

Sold individually.

$4.75

Need some luck? Here are some talismans to put in your pocket! 

Why are four-leaf clovers lucky?  

Four-leaf clovers are considered lucky for their rarity. In the Middle Ages, it was believed by some Celtic groups that wielding a four-leaf clover would help you see fairies, as well as to ward off evil spirits, and grant the holder good luck.  

Set of 3 Clover Good Luck Inspiration Coins with Organza Bag.

Clover Good Luck Inspiration Coins are deeply engraved and are made of lead free pewter. Inspiration Coins measure approx. 3/4″ x 1/2″. The tokens are sold as a set of 3 along with a 2″ x 2 1/2″ gold organza bag and can be used to create party favors, meditation and healing tools, gifts, wedding favors and good luck charms. The 3 tokens you will receive are double sided with a Four Leaf Clover pictured on the front and the words ‘Good Luck’ on the back. (6549-3)

$10.95

Mini Miniature Glass Four Leaf Clover Sitter Figurine Collectible – Sold Individually w/Gift Bag

Adorable miniature four leaf clover figurine sitter measures 1 3/4″ x 1 1/2″. Comes in a small organza gift bag.

Sold individually.

See our other glass sitters – collect them all!

$4.75

Mini Miniature Glass Starfish Sitter Figurine Collectible – Set of 3 in gift bag

Adorable miniature starfish figurines measures 2″. Set of 3 comes in a small organza gift bag. Light blue, dark blue and white.

Sold as a set of 3.

See our other glass sitters – collect them all!

$12.00

Miniature Colorful Glass Turtle Sitter

Know a turtle collector in your life? These make great gifts!

Adorable miniature turtle figurine measures 1 1/2″ x 1 3/4″. Comes in a small organza gift bag.

Choose from 5 different colors: Red, Light Blue, Dark Blue, Amber, Purple/Pink and Green.

Sold individually. 

$4.75

Women in Business Series: What I’ve Learned

After 10 successful interviews, I have concluded this round of my Women In Business blog posts. It was a really satisfying and empowering exercise – it was interesting to discover that no matter what kind of business you are running, owners across the board share many of the same philosophies, pieces of advice and personality traits. I feel a kinship to all 10 of my interviewees and am grateful for the time and honesty they afforded me in this project.

Here are 10 things that I learned:

  1. Do what you love. Find your passion, make a plan and be persistent.
  2. When you discover what you love, figure out what you are good at within that arena and stick to that. Resist the temptation to branch out in a million directions simply because people ask you to. Find your niche and become an expert.
  3. Don’t undersell or de-value yourself when setting your prices. You are the expert and you are worth it. Don’t give away your services.
  4. Don’t give up.
  5. Embrace the mistakes, learn from them, and move on.
  6. When obstacles suddenly rear their ugly heads (Pandemic anyone?) you must be willing to think outside the box and re-direct your focus. Often times the best things come from the most difficult of circumstances.
  7. Developing and maintaining relationships with your customers is very important. However, if a customer is not respectful or is taking advantage of you, it’s OK to say goodbye.
  8. Don’t lose yourself in your business. Being the owner brings with it a lot of responsibilities, but it’s important to have a healthly life outside of work.
  9. Pay yourself first.
  10. Have fun.

A huge thank you to the 10 businesses that shared their insights, challenges and philosophies:

Building Better People Productions
Sandy Cleaning
Paws pet boutique
FIT4MOM Phoenix Scottsdale
Hawkins Landscape Architecture
ASMM Digital Marketing
Polite Pups Academy, LLC
Kaila’s Kandles
Santa Lucia Estate Coffee
The Joyful Food Co.

Women In Business: Elizabeth Wood – The Joyful Food Co.

We continue our series on Women In Business where we highlight a wide variety of businesses that are owned and operated by women all around the country. Our goal is to learn from, inspire, motivate and celebrate this strong, unique, and diverse group of women.

Our spotlight today is on Elizabeth Wood, founder, co-owner, baker at The Joyful Food Co. Here’s what she told us.

What is your company?

The Joyful Food Co.

When was your company founded?

January 2015

What inspired you to form your own company?

My oldest son was dealing with some health problems and doctors couldn’t give us any answers. After doing a lot of research on my own, I decided to drastically change our family’s diet. We eliminated grains, refined sugars, dairy, and I made everything from scratch. It was a lot of trial and error (I only cooked and baked with pre-made mixes from the grocery store before this), but soon we were seeing improvements in our entire family’s health….and I was getting better at making food! Soon others asked me to bake for them and it kept growing until it only made sense to open a brick and mortar store.

What is the best part of your job?

The best part of the job is definitely our customers. Many of our customers are dealing with new diagnoses or trying to get to the bottom of health problems–it’s frustrating for them! But when I show them our ingredient labels, and they realize they still can have some of their favorite foods, it’s like a new world opening up to them. Even just meeting others who have been where they are is a relief to them. Sometimes we will have a child with food allergies come in who is used to having very limited options. Watching them learn they can eat anything we make is very rewarding!

What is the hardest part of your job?

The hardest part of my job is managing a staff. I don’t think most people start businesses because they love managing a team of people or paying sales tax or any of the mundane, background things that running a business requires. I opened a business because I love to bake, but now I have a staff of 9 people. Hiring, scheduling, firing–it’s very complicated to manage!

Have you found that being a woman owned business has helped your business?  

I don’t know that it has helped our business specifically, but it definitely informs how we (I have a business partner, also a woman) run our business. We have chosen to close our business at times when our children will be out of school because we want to spend time with them. We make sure our employees know that we value hard work but prioritize family. I’m not sure that is something you would hear at an interview if 2 men were in charge.

What are some obstacles that you’ve encountered being a minority business owner?

In the beginning, especially, I think I had a hard time being taken seriously. I tried to look at a space for my first location and one landlord scheduled a time with me, and then called me back later to ask where I was getting the money to do this and made it clear he didn’t want to waste his time. I also had a lot of people treat this like a hobby vs. a business at the beginning.

What is one piece of advice that someone gave you early on that you found to be invaluable?

Your time isn’t free. The older I get, I realize that not only is my time not free, my time is actually quite valuable. Whether this means costing my time into the recipes I make or being more thoughtful about how much of myself I’m willing to give to things like speaking at schools or in-depth requests for dietary help. I have learned to weigh out if these things are worth my time, and I don’t always mean monetarily worth my time. Is it worth more time away from my family? Is it worth preparing a presentation the night before, after working all day? Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn’t–but it is never free.

What is one piece of advice that would you give to someone that is thinking of starting their own business?

You can’t do everything. Decide what you’re going to do, and do a fantastic job at it. When I first opened my business, I was inundated with customers asking me to do special items for them or giving advice about what I should make or what I should carry in my store. Instead of branching out in 100 directions, I decided to do the things I wanted to do, the things I was good at, and the things I enjoyed, and do them very well.

What is one mistake that you made early on that you would re-do if given the chance?

While I’m sure I’ve made a number of missteps throughout the past 6 years, I wouldn’t change any of it. Each mistake taught me something about myself and better prepared me to manage this business in my own way.

What is one future goal that you have for the business?

A goal I hope for with my business is being able to hand off more responsibilities to others in the future. I would love to have a general manager that handles staffing and other aspects of managing the day to day business.

Who has inspired you the most in your business?

This probably sounds funny because my answer is someone I’ve never met before, but Bob Moore, the founder of Bob’s Red Mill has been an inspiration to me. I knew about the Bob’s Red Mill brand for years, and even used a number of products from the company before I ever heard Bob’s story. I love the podcast “How I Built This”, and one of the episodes told the story of Bob Moore and his mill. So many things about the story endeared Bob to me: his belief in good food for all, his devotion to his employees, his dedication to his craft, and his philosophy of people before profit. Everything about his business model and life philosophy feels like something to aspire to.

How has the pandemic affected your business?

The pandemic has been challenging, and we had the added stress of being handed the keys to our second location the week the pandemic was declared. Even though we were considered ‘essential’ since we were a food-based business, it seemed tone deaf to open a new store in the middle of the chaos and shutdowns. We delayed opening our new location by 2 months and transitioned our first location to curbside only while we navigated all of the changes. Luckily, in 2019, we had purchased a refrigerated van, so we were poised to increase our delivery business. Overall, business is still not back to normal for us, and we aren’t really sure how to measure ‘normal’ at our new location because it has only ever been open during a pandemic. But we are making it and if the pandemic taught us anything, it was how to pivot and be more flexible.

On days that are particularly hard with the business, what keeps you going?

Being able to laugh and vent with my business partner, Rebecca. It is invaluable to have a partner and to know that even when things seem terrible, at least you have each other. Also, messages from customers are so encouraging. Last weekend, a customer messaged me to let me know that a friend’s mother had been in hospice and my muffins were the only thing she could tolerate to eat. She told me what a blessing that was to the family and what a burden it lifted for the daughter who had been working so hard to find anything for her mother to possibly enjoy.

If you were not a bakery owner what would you be? 

In my dream world, a veterinarian!

Where do you see your business in 5 years?

I’ve had a lot of careers, and I hope I’m young enough to have a few more! In 5 years, I would love to be thinking about selling my business to someone who has the desire and business savvy to grow it even more.

What would you like people to know about your business?

That even 6 years in, I still feel like someone who should not be in charge of a business!! Like I said earlier, I started this because I love to bake. I have no formal culinary or business training, and sometimes I feel like an imposter. I am constantly learning as I go, whether that has to do with bookkeeping, managing employees, or even baking! Also, I would like people to know that even though we now have 2 locations, I am still as hands on as I’ve ever been. My partner and I manage all moving parts of the business.

What is something that everyone told you/warned you/shared with you about owning your own business that is not true?

I’m not sure if everybody told me this, but I think there is a perception that running your own business gives you a lot of flexibility and freedom. I think that is true in some cases, but when you own a very small business, each employee has a very specific job, so if even one employee is sick, the owner is likely the one who covers for them. The more employees you add, the more likely you are to have one who is sick or one who is on vacation or jury duty (at one point, we had 4 employees and 2 were called for jury duty the same week!). There is definitely some flexibility, but the buck stops with the owner, and that is a challenge.

Were people supportive of you when you went out on your own?

People were SO supportive of my business. They told their friends, shared on social media and showed up and bought food! The first few weeks I was open, I sold out of food nearly every day. I could not have asked for a more supportive community.

What do you say to the naysayers if you’ve ever encountered any as related to your business?

I have been incredibly lucky to be surrounded by support, but there is a saying that I’ve always loved: People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. That’s my overall philosophy of negative people–hush, I’m working over here!

How would your customers describe you?

I think they would describe me as hard working and joyful.

What has been your most favorite project to date?

At the beginning of the pandemic, we wanted to help with food insecurity in our community. This is something that has always been on my heart, especially that people in need should have access to healthy food. We started offering meal donations on our website. Customers can add a frozen meal donation to their order and for every 5 that are purchased, we donate one. We partnered with a local non-profit, Grace Klein Community (run by an amazing woman–Jenny Waltman) and they distribute the food to those in need. It has been so rewarding to send this healthy and delicious food their way and to experience the generosity of our customers.

Where do you find inspiration for a new idea or project?

I can’t credit a specific source, but I will say that I rarely get inspired to try something new when I’m working too much and feeling overwhelmed. Most of my good ideas come during time off when I have some space away from the stores.

What is one random fact about you that you would like people to know?

I have had a lot of jobs and careers: I’ve worked at a dude ranch, been a vet tech, a bank teller, and a pharmaceutical sales rep. I worked in a cancer research lab, was a stay-at-home mom, and later a water aerobics instructor. Most recently I am a baker and small business owner. I hope to add more to this list one day! It’s never too late to start a new chapter.

You can find Elizabeth and The Joyful Food Co. here:

TheJoyfulFoodCo.com

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Women In Business: Jodi Lehr – Santa Lucia Estate Coffee

We continue our series on Women In Business where we highlight a wide variety of businesses that are owned and operated by women all around the country. Our goal is to learn from, inspire, motivate and celebrate this strong, unique, and diverse group of women.

Our spotlight today is on Jodi Lehr, President of Santa Lucia Estate Coffee. Here’s what she told us.

What is your company?

Santa Lucia Estate Coffee

When was your company founded?

Santa Lucia was founded by my husband William Gutierrez in 1995, the early days of the speciality coffee movement.  I was in the restaurant industry, joined Santa Lucia in 2003 and became President in 2011.

What inspired you to form your own company?

With a growing specialty coffee market and a excellent unknown coffee product from Nicaragua we saw a niche that included great Chefs and restauranteurs who knew little about coffee.

What is the best part of your job?

Meeting wonderful people and being part of Washington DC’s fabulous hospitality community

What is the hardest part of your job?

As a company that grew by word of mouth and networking, it’s challenging keeping track of all the players in today’s expanding marketplace and getting them to know the Santa Lucia brand.

Have you found that being a woman business owner has helped your business? 

Yes. There is a sensitivity in communications that has assisted me throughout the years.

What are some obstacles that you’ve encountered being a minority business owner?

Like any business there are those that prefer working with men. Additionally as a working wife and mother our other jobs never seem to end…

What is one piece of advice that someone gave you early on that you found to be invaluable.

Relationships! Relationships! RELATIONSHIPS!

What is one piece of advice that would you give to someone that is thinking of starting their own business?

Have passion for what you do, and love what you are doing.

What is one mistake that you made early on that you would re-do if given the chance?

There were a few potential  clients we misread along the way and I still think about what we could have done to have been more successful in these efforts.

What is one future goal that you have for the business?

To return to post-Covid levels and then merge our e-commerce and wholesale businesses.

Who has inspired you the most in your business?

My husband William who has an incredible amount of passion for what he has done.

How has the pandemic affected your business?

With restaurants and hotels predominantly closed, our industry was devastated and sales dropped as significantly as  75%. Covid forced us to pivot to e-commerce for both the cash flow and in creating a purpose and focus in our days.

On days that are particularly hard with the business, what keeps you going?

Belief in the product and what we do.

If you were not in the coffee industry, what would you be?

Perhaps an innkeeper. I love the hospitality business.

Where do you see your business in 5 years?

Keeping our niche and diversity and laying a ground floor for our two sons should they want to venture into the coffee industry.

What would you like people to know about your business?

Santa Lucia Estate Coffee is a cared for family business with a beautiful product that comes from the high mountains of Nicaragua. We have brought it straight from the source and in turn pay a premium to support small farmers and the coffee community in Nicaragua. 

What is something that everyone told you/warned you/shared with you about owning your own business that is not true?

That it’s always glamorous. Instead you wear all hats and deal with all levels of stress, often too frequently!

Were people supportive of you when you went out on your own?

Yes. But there were also many that suggested a “traditional” corporate life would be more fulfilling and lucrative.

What do you say to the naysayers if you’ve ever encountered any as related to your business?

If you don’t take the chance you will never know. However being an entrepreneur and starting your own business takes risks and not everyone is comfortable with that.

How would your clients describe you?

Friendly, reliable and someone who believes in a great coffee product.

What has been your most favorite project to date?

Press/client trips to Nicaragua were definitely a highlight. Unfortunately the political climate in Nicaragua has not allowed us to continue.

What is one random fact about you that you would like people to know?

I was fortunate to be born into a family which ran a business and since an early age have grown up discussing business activities at the dinner table (like others talk sports). ..it’s made this lifestyle more the norm than not.

You can find Jodi and Santa Lucia Estate Coffee here:

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SantaLuciaCoffee.com